EARLY WORKS:

'Drawing is one of the core elements of my creativity: a spontaneous and unavoidable compulsion for the mind and the hands since I am completely unable to rest either one. As a small child I often lay in front of the fire at night and visualized the logs as geometrically decomposing entities like the futurist structure in Michelangelo Antonioni's Zabriskie Point which many years later, as a student of engineering, seemed oddly familiar'.

'Fish', Pen and Ink on paper circa 1986

Good Morning. Where are my shoe laces_ Who are you_ 16x20 72.jpg

THE SKINNARIAN SERIES:

When I was born they took me home and put me in a box. It had alarmed control systems for temperature, light, humidity and air flow. It was a large box measuring 6 ft. x 5 ft. by 2.5 ft. with double glass doors at the waist height of the average adult. Behind the doors was a removable washable mat. That’s where I resided as an infant.

The behavioral Psychologist B. F. Skinner had designed it. He marketed it under the name of  ‘The Baby Tender’. In our family it was simply referred to as ‘The Box’. My brother and sister also lived in the box, but not at the same time that I did. In the box I was unencumbered, with no need for blankets, as a diapered infant I could roll about and eventually, as I grew, I could enjoy toys that were hung in the box. I was taken out of the box to be fed and, I am told, also to be played with.

While many are horrified by the concept I believe that the box, in some ways, echoed the womb, except of course for the fact that it had large windows. There was complete freedom without blankets pinning me to the bottom of a crib. I had my own creative control and it was uniformly warm.

 

The Skinner Series is a reflection on situations, emotions and thought. It uses texts including partially hidden words in a manner illustrating the vagaries of what we may recognize, divulge or choose to carry as potentially secretive circumstances. It co-relates the psychological experiences of emotional thought and visceral reaction.

This series has never been exhibited. Click on the image to see more in this body of work.

Good Morning, where are my shoelaces? Who are you? 1997

Madonnas, Gestural Portraits and Masks

The face paintings by Philip Ross Munro found their origins in the work of a German Artist whose painting of the Madonna may be found in the Chapel of Santa Maria Novella in Rome. While as a student in the Atelier of Fresco at The Beaux Arts, Munro used this Madonna as the catalyst for his first original fresco painting. Since that time, Munro has continued periodically to add images to his production of Madonna and Gestural portraits. These works are larger than human scale.



Limited Edition fine art prints and a small number of originals are available from the collection of the artist.

 

 

 



'Joan', 21x29" Gouache on paper, 1984